The New York Times praises 'Pachinko', ahead of UK publication

‘A powerful meditation on what immigrants sacrifice to achieve a home in the world. PACHINKO confirms Lee's place among our finest novelists.’ Junot Díaz

‘A deep, broad, addictive history of a Korean family in Japan enduring and prospering through the 20th century.’ David Mitchell

 

파친       

PACHINKO

Min Jin Lee

 

The New York Times has praised Min Jin Lee's "stunning novel", ahead of its publication in the UK on 23 February 2017.

Pachinko is published by Apollo, an imprint from Head of Zeus. Apollo is setting out to rediscover classics, restoring remarkable books to print, as well introducing new and compelling works of international fiction. Min Jin Lee’s Pachinko spans eight decades and four generations, which David Mitchell hails as “a deep, broad, addictive history of a Korean family”.

 ‘Gripping from start to finish, crossing cultures and generations with breathtaking power.’  Erica  Wagner

 ‘This extraordinary book will prove a revelation of joy and heartbreak.  I could not stop turning the pages, and wished this most poignant of sagas would never end.’  Simon Winchester

Busan, Korea, 1911: A club-footed, cleft-lipped youth marries a fifteen-year-old beauty. The couple have one child, their beloved girl Sunja. When Sunja falls pregnant by a married yakuza, the family face ruin. But then Isak, a young Christian minister, offers her a chance of salvation: a new life in Japan as his wife.  

Following a man she barely knows to a country in which she has no friends, no home, and whose language she cannot speak, Sunja's salvation is just the beginning of her story. 

Through eight decades and four generations, Pachinko is an epic tale of family, identity, love, death and survival. 

AUTHOR

Min Jin Lee is an author and journalist. Her debut novel, Free Food for Millionaires, was named as one of the Top 10 Novels of the Year by The Times and USA Today.  She has written for the New York Times, The Times, Vogue and the Wall Street Journal. She wrote Pachinko whilst living in Tokyo, and now lives in New York with her family.